843-764-3333
7629 Sandlapper Parkway N. Charleston, SC 29420

Quartz CountertopsNear Summerville, SC

Let's Talk!

We offer a wide selection of stones and materials for your next kitchen renovation project:

Kitchen Remodeling Summerville, SC

Granite

 Bathroom Renovation Summerville, SC

Marble

 Flooring Summerville, SC

Quartzite

 Hardwood Flooring Summerville, SC

Recycle Glass

 Home Renovations Summerville, SC

Quartz

If you're in need of a professional, fast, reliable company for kitchen cabinets, countertops, and remodels, look no further than Everlasting Kitchen & Bath.

RM

What Clients Say About Us

Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Everlasting Kitchen & Bath?

Heading Tag

When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Summerville, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Everlasting KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Everlasting Difference

Heading Tag

Here at Everlasting Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

Physical-therapy-phone-number843-764-3333

Free Consultation

Latest News in Summerville, SC

Ground broken on Bonaire Park

The town of Summerville and South Cedar Development Associates LLC, a division of JJR Development LLC, celebrated the groundbreaking of Bonaire Park Monday, Dec. 18, on South Cedar St. Bonaire Park, a new urban enclave in downtown Summerville, is bringing more dining, shopping and stylish townhomes to our community, according to developers. The townhomes, each spanning 3 1/2 stories, have two-car garages, expansive living areas and elevators in 17 units. The rooftop penthouses have kitchenettes, powder rooms and private garden terraces. Visi...

The town of Summerville and South Cedar Development Associates LLC, a division of JJR Development LLC, celebrated the groundbreaking of Bonaire Park Monday, Dec. 18, on South Cedar St. Bonaire Park, a new urban enclave in downtown Summerville, is bringing more dining, shopping and stylish townhomes to our community, according to developers. The townhomes, each spanning 3 1/2 stories, have two-car garages, expansive living areas and elevators in 17 units. The rooftop penthouses have kitchenettes, powder rooms and private garden terraces. Visit bonaire-park.com for more information.

Sign up for updates!

Get weekly headlines from The Gazette (Goose Creek) in your inbox.

Email

By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The Post and Courier, 148 Williman Street, Charleston, SC, 29403, US, https://www.postandcourier.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

WarriorWOD has been awarded a $3,000 grant from the Boeing Employees Community Fund for 2023. This contribution will enable WarriorWOD to extend its specialized support to two more veterans in the Lowcountry area, aiding their recovery from Post-Traumatic Stress through a unique program focused on exercise, nutrition and mentorship.

WarriorWOD is dedicated to combating the alarming rates of veteran suicide and substance abuse. Its approach is grounded in the belief physical wellness, nutritional balance and community support are key pillars in healing the invisible wounds of war. This grant allows WarriorWOD to continue its mission, providing veterans with the resources to rebuild their lives post-service.

Thanks to the generosity of the Boeing Employees Community Fund, WarriorWOD will be able to provide comprehensive support to two additional veterans. Our program includes personalized fitness plans, nutritional guidance and one-on-one mentorship, all crucial in fostering mental and physical well-being.

The “Exercise as an RX” program stands on three foundational pillars — exercise, nutrition and mentorship — designed to produce tangible and transformative results. Veterans participating in WarriorWOD’s programs report improved quality of life, reduced symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress (PTS) and enhanced social functioning, with an overarching goal to reduce dependence on medications and substances by offering natural and holistic alternatives.​

“We are immensely grateful to the Boeing Employees Community Fund for their generous donation,” said Phil Palmer, founder and CEO of WarriorWOD. “Their support not only helps us in empowering veterans in their recovery journey but also reinforces the importance of community involvement in addressing the challenges faced by our heroes.”

Boeing has a long-standing commitment to supporting veterans and military families. This grant is a testament to their dedication to making a tangible difference in the lives of those who have served our nation.

Others are encourage others to follow in the footsteps of the Boeing Employees Community Fund. People’s support can make a significant impact on the lives of veterans struggling with Post-Traumatic Stress and other invisible wounds. To donate or learn more about how to help, visit www.warriorwod.org/donate.

“Every day, we strive to make a meaningful difference in the lives of those who have bravely served our country. Together, we can transform lives,” says Phil Palmer. Join us in our mission to empower veterans and champion their journey to healing.

For more information about WarriorWOD and how to get involved, visit www.warriorwod.org. Follow @thewarriorwod across all social media to stay updated on programs and the difference made in veterans’ lives.

For further inquiries, send an email to info@warriorwod.org.

Summerville mayoral candidates discuss key issues facing the growing town

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a ...

SUMMERVILLE — With Ricky Waring retiring, the mayoral seat in this growing community 20 miles north of Charleston is up for grabs.

The candidates: Dickie Miler, a Summerville native and real estate broker; Russ Touchberry, another Summerville native and current town councilman; and Vickie Fagan, who relocated from Staten Island more than a decade ago.

The Post and Courier spoke with the mayoral candidates about some of the big issues and concerns residents have in Summerville.

Fate of the old hospital

Miler said the property at 500 N. Main St., which has become a hot-button issue over the past few months, should be preserved. He has been a vocal opponent of the redevelopment of the property but said if there is redevelopment it should be strategic, sensible and promote enough economic vitality to warrant any changes made.

Touchberry hopes to preserve the old hospital as well, acknowledging it’s an important property. He also said its redevelopment can benefit the town and if done right could be a model for how other properties can be remade.

“We’ve lost the look and feel of Summerville on that side of the railroad tracks all the way to I-26,” Touchberry said. “This is an opportunity for us to have this reinvestment and reestablish our brand, which is what made us so special to begin with.”

Fagan also wants the property to be preserved but believes it can be repurposed as is. With all the available parking, the space could be used for emergency personnel, she said.

Growth and development

Miler said he supports a strategic approach to Summerville’s growth and would want to annex all he could on the periphery to protect the town’s border from neighboring cities like North Charleston and Goose Creek, which are also growing quickly.

“If we annex things on the outside, then we can control how we develop on the inside,” Miler said. “When and if we have to move and grow, we do it the way we want to do it, bringing the developer we want to bring in, have the neighborhood designed the way we want it.”

Touchberry pointed out that Summerville’s municipal boundaries are irregular but could be fixed by aligning the town’s comprehensive plan with the plans of Berkeley and Dorchester counties, and making sure all zoning standards line up as well. He added that if the town doesn’t have a strategic annexation plan, Summerville could easily be encircled by other municipalities.

Fagan said she’d like to assemble a task force for growth management and include voices from elected officials, civic groups and businesses. She said she values input from everyone and paying attention to how growth is affecting people in different areas can help the town come up with a plan as a united front.

Traffic and transport

Miler said he would want to incorporate more public transportation and improve sidewalks and bike paths so people can get around without a car.

“Building more roads is not always the answer,” Miler said.

He added he would be willing to reduce the median for some roads and even remove parking spots — like the parallel parking spots on Main Street at Hutchinson Square — so traffic isn’t as backed up.

Touchberry has been advocating for infrastructure improvements, such as sidewalk repairs, but one of his biggest priorities is finding a way to connect the Berlin G. Myers Parkway to Interstate 26 without the need to use, or cross, Main Street. He said he’s working with the Berkeley-Charleston-Dorchester Council of Governments, as well as Berkeley County and the town, to study that corridor and identify solutions.

Touchberry added that the town missed an opportunity in having the Lowcountry Rapid Transit stop in Summerville; the furthest it is planned to go for now is Ladson. He said he’s ready to fight to make sure the second phase is completed, so the workforce in Summerville can use it to get to Charleston and reduce commute time.

Lowes Foods to open Summerville store, close others

Lowes Foods, a Carolinas-based grocer, is opening a fifth store in the Charleston market in Summerville, while the company plans to close other locations.The Summerville store will be 50,887 square feet and will anchor a new retail center between two large Berkeley County residential developments, according to a news release. The new Lowes Foods store, scheduled to open in 2025, is on the northeast side of the 5,000-acre Nexton community.In addition, Lowes Foods has acquired Foothills IGA Market in Marble Hill, Ga., the release...

Lowes Foods, a Carolinas-based grocer, is opening a fifth store in the Charleston market in Summerville, while the company plans to close other locations.

The Summerville store will be 50,887 square feet and will anchor a new retail center between two large Berkeley County residential developments, according to a news release. The new Lowes Foods store, scheduled to open in 2025, is on the northeast side of the 5,000-acre Nexton community.

In addition, Lowes Foods has acquired Foothills IGA Market in Marble Hill, Ga., the release stated This will be the brand’s first store in Georgia. The store will continue to operate as an IGA for the next few months and will become a Lowes Foods store sometime in early 2024.

Related content: Construction begins on 278-unit community in Summerville

Related content: North Charleston apartments sell for more than $5.4M

Related content: Restaurant, entertainment venue opens in downtown Charleston

Along with the expansion, Lowes Foods will be making the decision to close two stores, the release stated. Food Country purchased the location in Stuart, Va., at the end of September. The store in Yadkinville, N.C., will be closing at the end of this month. Employees in the Yadkinville store are being given opportunities in other Lowes Foods.

“Lowes Foods is deeply committed to providing an exceptional shopping experience for our guests at all our store locations,” Tim Lowe, head of Retail, and Alex Lee, president, Lowes Foods said in the release. “Our coming stores in Summerville and Georgia will be important areas of growth for our company, and we’re excited about our continuing expansion in those markets. We also are pleased that Food Country has agreed to work to retain our employees in Stuart as our store there becomes part of the Food Country brand.”

In addition to Summerville and Marble Hill, Lowes has previously announced new stores in Aiken, and Kannapolis, Concord, Indian Land, and Winterville, N.C. A new store in Pittsboro, N.C., opened in June of this year.

Founded in 1954, Lowes Foods employs nearly 9,000 people and operates 82 full-service supermarkets in the Carolinas.

‘The future is growth’: Summerville businesses agree with proposed development

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Some businesses say prioritizing a sense of place in the town of Summerville is most important and sometimes that means new development, despite what some people might think.Dorchester County has a proposed plan to turn 500 N. Main St., also...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Some businesses say prioritizing a sense of place in the town of Summerville is most important and sometimes that means new development, despite what some people might think.

Dorchester County has a proposed plan to turn 500 N. Main St., also known as their main county building, into a hotel, retail spaces, a parking garage and more.

Some businesses located in the heart of Summerville, like Eva’s Restaurant, think change is about time.

“If we don’t have growth, we don’t have a future,” general manager Tina Howard said.

Eva’s Restaurant has been serving the town since 1944. With the proposed development, Howard says she’s not worried about competition.

“I think it would benefit us as a small business with, you know, bringing in tourists,” Howard said. “...I don’t feel it would hurt us personally because we have such a strong, established business.”

Diane Frankenberger, the owner of People, Places & Quilts, says she’s watched Summerville grow for over 30 years. She says with the old post office as the new public works art center, the old Coca-Cola company as the new YMCA and an old hardware store as her own business, she believes both the county and town councils prioritize preservation.

“You have to go forward with the future,” Frankenberger said. “We still can’t have the same houses around here and the old town hall and no computers and blah blah blah. And so, it’s keeping a sense of place, but moving forward with an eye towards the future.”

The county has already approved plans to preserve part of the county building, which once was the old hospital, and improve the current Veteran’s monument.

“I think when people are calling names or say, ‘Don’t do something,’ let’s wait and see and work together and make the best use of what we’ve got there,” Frankenberger said.

Howard says she wants her 6-year-old grandson to be able to experience a flourishing Summerville, just like she has all her life.

“A lot of people complain about the growth and ‘People will stop coming here, we’re full, don’t come here,’” Howard said. “Without growth, we don’t have a future. The future is growth.”

Frankenberger says she’s ready to move forward.

“No more gas on the fire,” Frankenberger said. “Let’s put water on the fire.”

Dorchester County provided the following statement about the proposed plan:

Dorchester County is looking forward to having greater capacity and flexibility to complete the following projects from fee revenues of the redevelopment:

Funding to preserve the façade of the old hospital building.

A new civic park and improvements to the Veterans Memorial.

An additional $8 Million in funding to DD2 schools to supplement $2 Million from the TIF.

Provide $20 Million in funding for a Community Recreation Facility in the Summerville area.

Provide $2 Million in additional funding for streetscaping and improvements to Main Street and Cedar Street.

Provide credits for workforce housing for teachers, firefighters, law enforcement, and first responders within the multi-family development for at least 15 years.

A modern County office building and additional Class A Office Space in the downtown area.

A new downtown hotel and restaurant to provide much-needed retail and hospitality amenities in the downtown area.

Create additional parking by providing for the construction of a parking garage in the downtown area.

Copyright 2023 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Charleston-area supermarket could soon become reality near planned 8,000-home community

Six years after a prominent grocery chain in the Charleston area bought land for a new store, the supermarket appears to be closer to taking shape on the edge of a planned 8,000-home community.Bidding documents show construction could begin in March 2025 on a 51,454-square-foot new ...

Six years after a prominent grocery chain in the Charleston area bought land for a new store, the supermarket appears to be closer to taking shape on the edge of a planned 8,000-home community.

Bidding documents show construction could begin in March 2025 on a 51,454-square-foot new Publix grocery store near Summerville.

Supermarket spokesman Jared Glover said the Florida-based company has not set a definite timeframe for the new store to be built “at this time.”

The food chain paid $3.05 million for 10 acres in 2017 at Beech Hill Road and Summers Drive across from the developing Summers Corner community southwest of Summerville.

Summers Corner, on S.C. Highway 61 and near U.S. Highway 17A, is a 7,200-acre tract that’s permitted for about 8,000 homes.

In addition to schools and shops, it has about 1,200 homes sold and another 250 under construction, according to Jason Byham, division president at Lennar, the homebuilder that bought the tract for more than $26 million in 2018.

Byham said he’s not surprised the long-planned Publix might be “more imminent” than in the past few years.

“We are selling about 50 homes per month on average in Summers Corner,” Byham said. “We expect to sell between 600 and 700 next year.”

Lennar also plans to develop a multi-million-dollar amenity center with a pool, restaurants and other attractions over the next two to three years on a 15-acre site off Summers Drive near Clayfield Trail.

A historic Broad Street property that’s housed banks, law firms and a publicly traded real estate company over the past 134 years or so is back under local ownership in a deal totaling $6.2 million.

An affiliate of EP Group purchased the 15,500-square-foot, three-and-a-half story building at 39 Broad St. for $5.58 million last week, according to public land records. The deal included an adjacent 16-space parking lot at 28 Elliott St., which sold for $620,000.

The seller was Healthcare Realty Trust of Tennessee.

The vacant commercial building is between East Bay and Church streets. It underwent a top-to-bottom renovation about eight years ago.

EP Group, which said it invests in middle-market, U.S. based businesses and is based on Meeting Street, plans to take part of the newly acquired property. A spokesman said the privately held company is reviewing “a range of possible plans” for the rest of the space.

“We look forward to being the stewards of this building and remaining part of the vibrant downtown community,” EP Group CEO Terry Hurley said in a written statement.

The new owner and The Post and Courier were owned by the same parent company until September 2021, when both were spun off as standalone businesses.

According to Historic Charleston Foundation, 39 Broad dates to the late 1800s — with the “marked verticality” of its arched windows among its most distinctive architectural features. The builder was Charles Otto Witte, a wealthy German-born businessman and consul for various European nations who once lived at what’s now the Ashley Hall school campus.

The structure later became known as the Exchange Bank and Trust Co. building, named for an early tenant was established in 1891. Local archives show a law firm and Merchants’ and Miners’ Bank were operating at the same address a few years earlier.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.