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Why Install New Kitchen Cabinets with Everlasting Kitchen & Bath?

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When it comes to kitchen remodeling in Ravenel, SC installing new kitchen cabinets is a great idea. If you're already upgrading or replacing your kitchen countertops, having new cabinets that match the aesthetics of your kitchen makeover is a no-brainer.

At Everlasting KB, we believe that everyone deserves an elegant, versatile kitchen with stunning cabinetry. That's why our team will work closely with you to discover the material, texture, and style of cabinets you're craving. Once we do, we handle all the heavy lifting, including cabinet design and installation in your home.

So, why should you install new kitchen cabinets alongside your countertops? Here are just a few reasons:

01
Matching Design

Matching Design

Many customers install new kitchen cabinets because they're already remodeling their kitchen and need their cabinets to match the aesthetics of their updated space. Do you want your kitchen to feel more open and airier? Do you have specific lifestyle requirements that necessitate a particular cabinet material? Our kitchen cabinet experts can help you find the perfect cabinet setup for your needs.

02
More Storage

More Storage

Having a uniform aesthetic throughout your kitchen and home is important. But from a practical standpoint, new kitchen cabinets often mean more kitchen storage. That's a big deal for families, especially when younger children are involved. If you find that your countertops are magnets for clutter, new cabinetry can help remove the mess and stress less. The more storage your kitchen has, the easier it will be to use your kitchen for cooking and entertaining.

03
Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Boost Resale Value of Your Home

Take a few moments and check out the bones of your current cabinets. Low-quality, cheap cabinets are often a turnoff for potential buyers. If you plan on selling your home in the next few years, one of the best ways to boost resale value is with new cabinetry.

04
Enhanced Functionality

Enhanced Functionality

Is it a pain in the side to cook in your kitchen? Whether it's due to clutter, design, or something else, many of our customers want new cabinets so that their kitchen is functional again. New cabinets give you more storage, as mentioned above, but they can also make your kitchen more functional, depending on design and remodeling preferences. If you love to cook for your family and get-togethers, investing in new kitchen cabinets can help you do more of what you love.

05
Stunning First Impressions

Stunning First Impressions

Whether you're looking to "wow" a new client or work colleague or just want to make your neighbors a little jealous, upgrading your kitchen cabinets is a great way to do so. Of course, first impressions have always mattered, but particularly so in real estate. When the time comes to sell your home, having custom cabinets and countertops in your kitchen can set you apart from other sellers.

The Everlasting Difference

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Here at Everlasting Kitchen & Bath, we specialize in custom kitchen countertops and cabinets designed especially for you. Whether you've been dreaming of traditional wood cabinets or need sleek, elegant granite countertops, we've got you covered. We are committed to affordable options while holding true to our craftsmanship and skills, providing customers with the best kitchen renovations in South Carolina.

If you're looking for the largest selection and the best prices, visit our showroom or contact us today. You've worked hard to make your home special, so why not your kitchen too? From design to installation, our team is here to help you every step of the way.

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Latest News in Ravenel, SC

What drives you crazy? The “dangerous” intersection of SC 165 and Highway 17 in Ravenel

RAVENEL, S.C. (WCBD) – Traffic patterns, potholes, speeding, and more – our team is working to find solutions to problems that are driving you crazy on the roads.Over the past few weeks, News 2 has heard from many of you about problems on the roadways – but one issue had stood out more than the others: the intersection of SC-165 and Highway 17.Nearly a dozen people who reached out about the intersection in Ravenel called it extremely dangerous. We met with many of those viewers to learn more.Jack Scarbo...

RAVENEL, S.C. (WCBD) – Traffic patterns, potholes, speeding, and more – our team is working to find solutions to problems that are driving you crazy on the roads.

Over the past few weeks, News 2 has heard from many of you about problems on the roadways – but one issue had stood out more than the others: the intersection of SC-165 and Highway 17.

Nearly a dozen people who reached out about the intersection in Ravenel called it extremely dangerous. We met with many of those viewers to learn more.

Jack Scarborough said large vehicles, like tractor-trailers, approach the intersection at a high rate of speed, often running the red light and causing accidents that are sometimes deadly.

“When you hear that fire engine, with the siren going, and you can tell that it’s stopping at that intersection, you’re like ‘oh geez, there’s another accident,’ and ‘God, I just hope no one is seriously injured or dead,’” said Scarborough.

Another Ravenel resident, Joan Van Scyoc, said this intersection has worried her family for over a decade.

She said it’s hard to see oncoming traffic when you’re turning north and that the speed limit should be reduced ahead of the signal.

“It’s death-defying, sometimes, to make this turn. Especially now that traffic is increasing quite a bit in the area, and they’re going at a high rate of speed,” said Scyoc.

Both Jack and Joan say having a left turn arrow – turning north onto 165 from 17 – would solve most of the problems.

We took their concerns to the South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT), and now we’re letting you know that a solution may soon become a reality.

Kelly Moore, Director of Public Engagement for SCDOT said a project is underway that will add a left turn arrow to the northbound 17 left turn at the intersection.

The project is expected to go out for bid this month, and once a contract is awarded, SCDOT will have more information regarding the timeline and cost.

Count on News 2 to keep you updated on the project.

If you have something that drives you crazy on the roads, we want to know about it. Simply email mfee@wcbd.com or fill out the online form by clicking here.

Ravenel to consider annexing 3rd large tract in 2 years south of Charleston

RAVENEL — For the third time in less than two years, this small suburban Charleston County town is poised to annex another sizable tract and expand its residential and commercial base.Ravenel’s Planning Commission will hold the first of two public hearings Feb. 23 to consider adding 755 acres along County Line Road for the creation of The Preserve at Ravenel where Augusta-based Southeastern plans to build up to 350 residences across the street from its Poplar Grove development.An affiliate of the Georgia builder bou...

RAVENEL — For the third time in less than two years, this small suburban Charleston County town is poised to annex another sizable tract and expand its residential and commercial base.

Ravenel’s Planning Commission will hold the first of two public hearings Feb. 23 to consider adding 755 acres along County Line Road for the creation of The Preserve at Ravenel where Augusta-based Southeastern plans to build up to 350 residences across the street from its Poplar Grove development.

An affiliate of the Georgia builder bought the land in 2004 from MeadWestvaco Forestry LLC for $2.04 million, according to Charleston County property records.

Construction on houses and townhomes in The Preserve is planned to occur over five to 10 years on nearly 300 acres, according to Vic Mills, Southeastern’s CEO. Roughly half of that acreage is slated for parks, trails and open space around the planned residences.

Another 25 acres near a bend of Davison and County Line roads is set aside as a business node. About 130 acres, or 17 percent of the larger tract, is undevelopable wetlands.

Nearly half of the land set to be annexed, about 336 acres along the backside of The Preserve tract, is designated as agricultural land and not slated for development, according to Mills.

Ravenel Mayor Steve Tumbleston said he’s in favor of “some version” of the planned development, but he wants more input from the Planning Commission and the public.

“I think there is going to be some negotiations,” he said.

He noted the biggest concern he hears from residents is that the annexation will lead to an explosion of growth within the town’s limits.

“That just can’t happen,” Tumbleston said. “We don’t have the sewer capacity.”

The town has a new sewer system with a limit of about 2,000 taps for residential and commercial development. More than half of the taps have been set aside for already-approved ventures. The rest is committed to commercial projects, future affordable housing and infill development along U.S. Highway 17.

A historic Broad Street property that’s housed banks, law firms and a publicly traded real estate company over the past 134 years or so is back under local ownership in a deal totaling $6.2 million.

An affiliate of EP Group purchased the 15,500-square-foot, three-and-a-half story building at 39 Broad St. for $5.58 million last week, according to public land records. The deal included an adjacent 16-space parking lot at 28 Elliott St., which sold for $620,000.

The seller was Healthcare Realty Trust of Tennessee.

The vacant commercial building is between East Bay and Church streets. It underwent a top-to-bottom renovation about eight years ago.

EP Group, which said it invests in middle-market, U.S. based businesses and is based on Meeting Street, plans to take part of the newly acquired property. A spokesman said the privately held company is reviewing “a range of possible plans” for the rest of the space.

“We look forward to being the stewards of this building and remaining part of the vibrant downtown community,” EP Group CEO Terry Hurley said in a written statement.

The new owner and The Post and Courier were owned by the same parent company until September 2021, when both were spun off as standalone businesses.

According to Historic Charleston Foundation, 39 Broad dates to the late 1800s — with the “marked verticality” of its arched windows among its most distinctive architectural features. The builder was Charles Otto Witte, a wealthy German-born businessman and consul for various European nations who once lived at what’s now the Ashley Hall school campus.

The structure later became known as the Exchange Bank and Trust Co. building, named for an early tenant was established in 1891. Local archives show a law firm and Merchants’ and Miners’ Bank were operating at the same address a few years earlier.

Town of Ravenel looks to annex 4th tract in 2 years for new residential development

RAVENEL — This small town of 2,700 people southwest of Charleston could double in population within 10 years to the current size of neighboring Hollywood as more than 1,100 new homes are built in two previously annexed large tracts and another one vote away from being added.At the same time, of...

RAVENEL — This small town of 2,700 people southwest of Charleston could double in population within 10 years to the current size of neighboring Hollywood as more than 1,100 new homes are built in two previously annexed large tracts and another one vote away from being added.

At the same time, officials are considering annexing another parcel for more new residences, its fourth tract in two years.

Ravenel’s planning board will consider a request March 23 to annex 20 acres on New Road adjacent to a 24-acre parcel already in the town for a new housing development called The Stables on the combined 44-acre tract.

Homebuilder D.R. Horton plans to build 52 single-family houses on 19 acres, according to site plans. The company also wants to set aside just over 1 acre for commercial space, about 8 acres for a water feature and 16 acres for green space. Part of the property is undevelopable wetlands.

The development, south of U.S. Highway 17 at 5823 and 5827 New Road, would have public water but be served by septic systems.

The pending annexation comes as the town considers a proposal to annex 755 acres on Davison and County Line roads for a new housing project called The Preserve. Augusta-based developer Southeastern wants to build 350 homes and set aside 25 acres for commercial space across from the firm’s Poplar Grove development.

A historic Broad Street property that’s housed banks, law firms and a publicly traded real estate company over the past 134 years or so is back under local ownership in a deal totaling $6.2 million.

An affiliate of EP Group purchased the 15,500-square-foot, three-and-a-half story building at 39 Broad St. for $5.58 million last week, according to public land records. The deal included an adjacent 16-space parking lot at 28 Elliott St., which sold for $620,000.

The seller was Healthcare Realty Trust of Tennessee.

The vacant commercial building is between East Bay and Church streets. It underwent a top-to-bottom renovation about eight years ago.

EP Group, which said it invests in middle-market, U.S. based businesses and is based on Meeting Street, plans to take part of the newly acquired property. A spokesman said the privately held company is reviewing “a range of possible plans” for the rest of the space.

“We look forward to being the stewards of this building and remaining part of the vibrant downtown community,” EP Group CEO Terry Hurley said in a written statement.

The new owner and The Post and Courier were owned by the same parent company until September 2021, when both were spun off as standalone businesses.

According to Historic Charleston Foundation, 39 Broad dates to the late 1800s — with the “marked verticality” of its arched windows among its most distinctive architectural features. The builder was Charles Otto Witte, a wealthy German-born businessman and consul for various European nations who once lived at what’s now the Ashley Hall school campus.

The structure later became known as the Exchange Bank and Trust Co. building, named for an early tenant was established in 1891. Local archives show a law firm and Merchants’ and Miners’ Bank were operating at the same address a few years earlier.

Southern Charm's Thomas Ravenel SLAMS ex Kathryn Dennis calling her the 'worst person' while saying her costars are 'total losers' for supporting her

Southern Charm alum Thomas Ravenel dragged his ex Kathryn Dennis after her former costars spoke out in support of her at BravoCon.'The worst person in the world I know is Kathryn Dennis and the total losers who make excuses and applaud her horrific behavior like Craig [Conover] and Shep [Rose] and Austen [Kroll]. Total Losers,' the 61-year-old politician - who rece...

Southern Charm alum Thomas Ravenel dragged his ex Kathryn Dennis after her former costars spoke out in support of her at BravoCon.

'The worst person in the world I know is Kathryn Dennis and the total losers who make excuses and applaud her horrific behavior like Craig [Conover] and Shep [Rose] and Austen [Kroll]. Total Losers,' the 61-year-old politician - who recently suffered a punctured lung in a polo accident - wrote in a since-deleted tweet on Tuesday, per Page Six.

After a fan asked Ravenel on X why he 'picked' Dennis to be the mother of two of his children -- the exes share eight-year-old daughter Kensington and six-year-old son St. Julien -- the former reality star replied, 'Damn good question! You got me there!'

When another X follower inquired online, 'So what has set off this tangent? What has KD done this time?', Ravenel answered, 'She was involved in a hit and run at an elementary school crossing. Anymore questions???'

In October, a vehicle registered in the 32-year-old's name was involved in an alleged hit-and-run at Whitesville Elementary School in her native South Carolina.

Critic: Southern Charm alum Thomas Ravenel dragged his ex Kathryn Dennis after her former costars spoke out in support of her at BravoCon

Harsh words: Ravenel said, 'The worst person in the world I know is Kathryn Dennis and the total losers who make excuses and applaud her horrific behavior like Craig [Conover] and Shep [Rose] and Austen [Kroll]. Total Losers'

Ravenel's social media slams came after Conover revealed at BravoCon over the weekend that the cast was 'in touch' with Dennis -- who departed the series after eight seasons in January.

'The door’s always open and I think she’s working on herself and has a lot of work that she has to do before she comes back,' Conover said on the panel.

Rose added, 'We’ve come a long way and you’ve all seen the bumps and bruises and all that stuff and unfortunately, Kathryn stumbles sometimes.

'We do love her because there’s a person right inside of her that we know is a good person.'

In May, it was reported Ravenel temporarily won custody of their two kids after a long custody dispute since their separation in 2016, per The Sun.

Thomas originally filed for sole custody in 2020, with Kathryn temporarily losing custody in 2021.

In 2021, after he was temporarily awarded full custody, his attorney said: 'I can confirm the information released last week that Ms. Dennis currently has weekend, daytime supervised visitation with the parties' minor children and that Mr. Ravenel plans to relocate with the children to Aiken, South Carolina this summer.'

The pair previously shared joint custody of their children, and the arrangement worked well for the exes, according to the Southern Charm star.

Still friends: Ravenel's social media slams came after Conover revealed at BravoCon over the weekend that the cast was 'in touch' with Dennis -- who departed the series after eight seasons in January; Conover and Rose at BravoCon 2023

Better days: Ravenel and Dennis first began dating in 2013 before splitting up for good in 2016

Departure: Dennis departed the series after eight seasons in January

'We actually have a great coparenting relationship,' she told Us Weekly in November 2019.

'It's good for him, it's good for me. We're moving forward, which is the first time I've said that in a long time and it feels good.'

The positive words struck a contrast to their otherwise ugly custody battle, with Thomas accusing Kathryn of being addicted to prescription medications and marijuana, among other allegations. Dennis denied the accusations.

Ravenel and Dennis first began dating in 2013 before splitting up for good in 2016.

Silent walk over Ravenel Bridge honors heroes, victims of September 11, 2001 terror attacks

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Police, firefighters and community members gathered Monday morning for a walk on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in a show of support for the first responders and heroes of the September 11, 2001, terror attacks.The 10th Annual 9-11 Silent Walk began in Charleston and came to an end at the USS Yorktown at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant.No words were exchanged and only the sound of cars passing by could be heard as people from all over the Lowcountry and beyond participated in the silen...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCBD) – Police, firefighters and community members gathered Monday morning for a walk on the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge in a show of support for the first responders and heroes of the September 11, 2001, terror attacks.

The 10th Annual 9-11 Silent Walk began in Charleston and came to an end at the USS Yorktown at Patriots Point in Mount Pleasant.

No words were exchanged and only the sound of cars passing by could be heard as people from all over the Lowcountry and beyond participated in the silent walk across the Ravenel Bridge during the morning hours.

Tian Griffieth, who serves as executive director and captain of the North Charleston Fire Department, said this decade-old ceremony started with a text message that was sent 10 years ago.

“This has been something that we started out as five friends … a text message saying hey, let’s go something on 9-11. We came out, we walked that day the entire Ravenel Bridge and that day set off a chain of events that have allowed us to be here for the last decade,” he said.

Now, thousands have joined the walk with support from across the spectrum – from kids who were born after September 11, 2001, to those who were there in person when the attacks happened 22 years ago.

“We immediately saw the smoke, and there was a solid stream of people that were running out of the area. We got to the base just before the collapse and we started taking care of people,” recalled 9/11 first responder Johan Zamoscianyk.

“We had seen the first plane hit the towers. We went from Queens, and by the time we got into Manhattan the second plane had hit and the first tower came down,” said Retired NYPD Detective Michael Rooney.

The moment of silence and process of first responders across the Ravenel — a symbol to serve as a reminder for everyone to see.

“We put 343 firefighters on this bridge every year, police officers, members of the community, walking as a symbol of those people that were lost,” said Capt. Griffieth.

After reaching the end of the Ravenel Bridge, participants gathered on the flight deck of the USS Yorktown where organizers held additional events commemorating 9/11 and the first responders.

“It’s a surreal event. Seeing everybody walking across the bridge is reminiscent of people walking up the westside highway,” said Zamoscianyk.

Event organizers say since the inaugural walk in 2013, over 6,000 people have walked the Ravenel Bridge to honor the victims of the September 11, 2001, terror attacks.

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